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HRN Original Blog:
Saratoga Journal with Bill Heller

Thursday, July 21st - A Memorable First Saratoga Visit

Secretariat
Everybody remembers their first time, don’t they?              
 
In our college dorm on a late Saturday morning in late August, 1972, four of us were wondering what we could do that afternoon, two days before we’d begin our sophomore year at Albany State. Mike Brown had a car and one of us said, “Let’s go to Saratoga.”

That sounded cool to me. Growing up in Liberty, New York, in the heart of the Borscht Belt some 90 miles southwest of Albany, I’d been to a harness track, Monticello Raceway, but never seen Thoroughbreds race.
 
We checked a newspaper to make sure Saratoga was racing, got on the Northway and headed to Saratoga Springs, a 35-minute drive. Being brilliant about-to-be sophomores, we wound up at Saratoga Harness. We were stunned. There wasn’t a single car in the parking lot.

“There can’t be two tracks in one small city,” one of us – yes it was me – said. Wrong. There were, of course, two tracks. We eventually figured that out and drove to Saratoga Race Course. We parked about 10,000 miles from the track, and by the time we arrived it was the middle of the card.
 
Pooling our limited resources, we bought a track program to share. We couldn’t afford a copy of the Daily Racing Form. Actually, we could have, but that might have involved dipping into our beer money. And that wasn’t going to happen.

We split a couple of small bets and we looked forward to the feature race that afternoon, the Hopeful Stakes for two-year-olds. Mike and Howie split a show bet on a 99-1 shot who may still be out there. I was curious about the heavy favorite, Secretariat, and decided to watch the race rather than bet on or bet against the 3-10 favorite.

Secretariat had the outside post in a field of nine and got away dead last. Even I, despite my lack of sophistication as a racing fan, knew that was big trouble in a short race. But then, jockey Ronnie Turcotte cut Secretariat loose heading into the turn. Despite racing six-wide, he circled the entire field and had the lead by the time they hit the head of the stretch. And he never stopped accelerating, winning by five lengths. His move was breathtaking. Electrifying. And I was hooked for life.

Later, I’d realize Secretariat ran his middle quarter in a tick under :22 2/5 while six-wide on the turn. Ronnie would later tell me that Secretariat was the fastest horse on turns he’d ever ridden or seen. See, nearly 20 years after the Hopeful, Ronnie gave me the opportunity of a lifetime, to write his biography, the biography of the jockey who rode the greatest horse anyone has ever seen.

I count myself lucky to have seen him that afternoon in ‘72. After we got to the right track.
 
*****************

Ronnie’s biography, “The Will To Win,” is one of Eclipse Award-winner Bill Heller’s 23 books. You can purchase Bill’s latest two books, “Above It All,” a biography of another Hall of Fame jockey, Jose Santos, and “Captain Free-lance; The Check Is In The Mail,” at www.billhellerbooks.com. Bill will be signing “Above It All” at the Hall of Fame Friday morning from 10 a.m. to noon.

 

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Older Comments about Thursday, July 21st - A Memorable First Saratoga Visit...

Awesome. Not had too many trips abroad, but, I did see Holy Bull and Concern on my first visit. Just think, when Holy Bull was injiured @ Gulfstream, and subsequently retired from racing, the horse that emerged out of that race was Cigar. Wouldn't that have been something to seen that rivalry?
Wow..what are the chances of seeing that big red horse first time out..i only saw him work once and i can still hear him galloping..1974
Empty Caset The All time horse of the Decade
Wow, Secretariat at your first race
Wow, first time at the track and seeing one of the greatest horses ever to race. I can't top Secretariat, but I did get to see Spectacular Bid set the record for 1 1/4 miles in the Strub in my first trip to the races. I have seen a lot of good horse since that first day, John Henry, Cigar, Curlin, Sunday Silence, Easy Goer, Invasor, Rachel, Zenyatta, but have never seen a better horse than Spectacular Bid.
Meet, too, one of biggest disappoints of my life is that I did not get to see Secretariat in person.
I Envy you and wish I could have seen the big red machine at work!

Categories

Meet Bill Heller
 
Multiple national award-winner Bill Heller, a member of the Harness Racing Hall of Fame Communicators Corner, has written 23 books including the biographies of Hall of Fame jockeys Ronnie Turcotte, Randy Romero, Jose Santos; Harness Hall of Fame legend Billy Haughton and NBA Coach Bill Musselman. His other books include “A Good Day Has No Rain,” documenting the radioactive fallout in the Capital District of New York State from an atom bomb test; “After the Finish Line; The Race to End Horse Slaughter in America,” and “Playing Tall, the Ten Shortest Players in NBA History.” Bill was presented the 1997 Eclipse Award for magazine writing about Thoroughbred racing; the William Leggett Breeders’ Cup Writing Award and three John Hervey Awards for magazine writing about harness racing.  

Bill is a regular contributor to Trainer Magazine and Canadian Sportswriter, while also serving as the Thoroughbred handicapper for the Daily Gazette in Schenectady, New York.